PLEASE NOTE:


*

CCNet, 15/2000 - 7 February 2000
--------------------------------
added note: ANOTHER ASTEROID ON POTENTIAL IMPACT COURSE DISCOVERED

     QUOTE OF THE DAY

     "A bizarre fragrance that smells of meteorites has been developed
     by British perfume experts, New Scientist reports. The odour,
     called Cyba, smells "sulphurous, smoky, like gunpowder, metallic
     [...] The 'futuristic, atmospheric' perfume [...] was developed by
     analysing the smell given off by molecules of carbonaceous
     chondrite, the commonest mineral found on meteorites."
          -- New Scientist, 4 February 2000


(1) METEORITE IMPACT ON THE MOON?
    Sirko Molau <molau@informatik.rwth-aachen.de>

(2) QUESTIONABLE IMAGE OF A LUNAR IMPACT
    Daniel Fischer <dfischer@astro.uni-bonn.de>

(3) SMALL SUNSPOT, BIG FLARE
    Space Science News <express@spacescience.com>

(4) SUPERVOLCANOES COULD TRIGGER GLOBAL FREEZE
    Michael Paine <mpaine@tpgi.com.au>

(5) PLANETARY SOCIETY CELEBRATES NEAR EARTH ASTEROID RENDEZVOUS
    Linda Wong <tps@planetary.org>

(6) A POTENTIAL SENSOR FOR FAINT PHOS?
    Bob Kobres <bkobres@uga.edu>

(7) A REVIEW OF COMET AND ASTEROID STATISTICS
    T. Gehrels, UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA,TUCSON,AZ,85721

(8) HIGH-VELOCITY OBLIQUE IMPACT EXPERIMENTS
     M. Yanagisawa*) & S. Hasegawa, UNIVERSITY OF ELECTROCOMMUNICATION,

(9) JAPANESE CONTRIBUTION TO METEOROID & DEBRIS MEASUREMENT
     H. Yano, INSTITUE OF SPACE & ASTRONAUT SCIENCE

(10) E-NTERVIEW WITH DAVID RAUP
     Robert Clements <Robert.Clements@dva.gov.au>

(11) DID ICE AGE CULTURES LOSE TECHNOLOGICAL SKILLS ?
     Bob Kobres <bkobres@uga.edu>

(12) AND FINALLY: EAU D'ASTEROID - WHAT A STINKER
     Duncan Steel <D.I.Steel@salford.ac.uk>


=============
(1) METEORITE IMPACT ON THE MOON?

From Sirko Molau <molau@informatik.rwth-aachen.de>

Hello friends,

it seems that on Tuesday, January 18, around 18:00 UT a meteorite
impact on the moon was observed visually and photographically by
different amateur astronomers in Germany. A first picture of the event,
which is currently under investigation, was published in several German
newspapers and can be found at
http://www.ticker.de/archiv2000/02/02/newsmix/story2.html, for example.

It looks like an artifact, but now there seem to be independent 
confimations of the event. Have you heard about similar observations at
that time?

Sirko Molau

===================
(2) QUESTIONABLE IMAGE OF A LUNAR IMPACT

From Daniel Fischer <dfischer@astro.uni-bonn.de>

Dear Benny,

German media are abuzz with an alleged photograph taken by a
Berlin-based amateur astronomer that seems to show a gigantic impact on
the Moon - and the various experts quoted in the articles apparently
haven't looked at it in any detail. To me the 'feature' looks very much
like an optical artefact (a caustic in the widest sense), judging from
a low-resolution wire service version of the picture. It's also amazing
that the media are celebrating this image as the first one ever of a
lunar impact, completely ignoring the Leonid impact flashes that were
videographed after the storm of 1999...

Here are three links to German media stories - the Berlin newspaper
article that started the buzz, and subsequent wire service coverage:

http://www.tagesspiegel.de/archiv/2000/02/01/ak-be-st-9206.html
http://rp-online.de/wissenschaft/000202/meteorit.shtml
http://www.ticker.de/archiv2000/02/02/newsmix/story2.html (with the image).

Regards, Daniel

===============
(3) SMALL SUNSPOT, BIG FLARE

From Space Science News <express@spacescience.com>

Space Science News for February 6, 2000

Small Sunspot, Big Flare: One of the biggest and brightest optical
flares of the current sunspot cycle erupted this weekend. The flare was
a whopper, but the sunspot group it came from wasn't. The full story,
which includes pictures of the flare and a coronal mass ejection, is
at:

http://www.spacescience.com/headlines/y2000/ast06feb_1.htm

===============
(4) SUPERVOLCANOES COULD TRIGGER GLOBAL FREEZE

From Michael Paine <mpaine@tpgi.com.au>

Dear Benny,

BBC has an article about the effects of large volcanic eruptions on
global climate. The described effects appear very similar to those of a
large NEO impact.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/sci/tech/newsid_628000/628515.stm

regards
Michael Paine

===============
(5) PLANETARY SOCIETY CELEBRATES NEAR EARTH ASTEROID RENDEZVOUS

From Linda Wong <tps@planetary.org>

NEWS RELEASE

The Planetary Society
65 N. Catalina Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91106-2301 (626) 793-5100 Fax (626)
793-5528
E-mail: tps@planetary.org 
Web: http://planetary.org

For Immediate Release: February 3, 2000
Contact: Susan Lendroth

Planetary Society Celebrates NEAR's Tryst with Eros

On February 14, 2000, the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR)
spacecraft will arrive at its destination, an asteroid called Eros. 
The Planetary Society, in cooperation with the Johns Hopkins University
Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL), will mark this occasion with two
special events in Laurel, Maryland on Thursday, February 10 -- the
first All-Student Press Conference at the Johns Hopkins University
Applied Physics Laboratory and a free evening event for the general
public.

STUDENT PRESS CONFERENCE

The Student Press Conference will encompass both the NEAR mission and
the broader concept of future exploration of the solar system. 
Panelists will include Dr. Louis Friedman, Executive Director of The
Planetary Society; Dr. Robert Gold, NEAR Science Payload Manager; Dr.
Noam Izenberg, NEAR NIS Team Member; and Dr. Roald Sagdeev, professor
at the University of Maryland, and the former director of the Institute
for Space Research, Russian Academy of Sciences.

While active participation in the Student Press Conference is limited
to young journalists from area middle schools and high schools,
mainstream journalists are welcome to attend as observers.  In other
words, only the students will be permitted ask the panelists questions!
However, the media can arrange interviews with the panelists at the
conclusion of the Student Press Conference.

JHU/APL will host a lunch and a presentation about the laboratory's
work for the students and their teachers following the press
conference. Several Maryland schools have already registered to attend.

NEAR'S TRYST WITH EROS

Thursday evening, February 10, The Planetary Society and JHU/APL will
host a free public event entitled "NEAR's Tryst with Eros" at the
JHU/APL Kossiakoff Conference and Education Center, from 7:00 to 8:30
PM. Speakers will include Louis Friedman; Tom Coughlin, NEAR Project
Manager from JHU/APL; and a team of NEAR Science and Engineering
Leaders.

"NEAR's Tryst with Eros" will provide an overview of the mission
objectives as well as the reasons why near earth asteroids are such
interesting small bodies to study. What can we learn from Eros in
particular and asteroids in general? What was their role in the
formation of the solar system? What threat might they pose to human
civilization in the future? All this and more will be covered in a
presentation that will include slides and video.

NAME THE CRATERS CONTEST

The NEAR team has invited Planetary Society members and others to
suggest crater names for Eros, which will later be submitted to the
International Astronomical Union (IAU) for official consideration. 
Named for the Greek god of love, Eros will be a fitting Valentine's Day
target for NEAR to begin courting in a year-long mission in which the
spacecraft will image and study the 33-kilometer-long asteroid.  In
keeping with the asteroid's namesake, the theme for crater names will
be love. The craters of Eros can be named after famous lovers,
legendary romantic locales, aspects of love, and so on. Name
submissions -- accompanied by a short explanation (50 words maximum) --
may be brought to the public event or mailed to The Planetary Society. 
Send submissions to Names on Eros, The Planetary Society, 65 N.
Catalina Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91106.  For more information, visit the
Society's website at http://planetary.org and click on "Help Name
the Craters of Eros" in the Contest section.

The Student Press Conference will take place Thursday, February 10,
2000 at 10:00 AM, at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics
Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, Maryland.  To register,
schools must contact Linda Butler at (443)778-5746 from Baltimore or
(240)228-5746 from Washington. Unless alternate arrangements are made,
each school is limited to sending two student journalists accompanied
by one adult mentor.

The public event, "NEAR's Tryst with Eros," will be held Thursday,
February 10 at 7:00 PM at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics
Laboratory. Admission is free and on a first come, first served basis.

For more information on NEAR, visit http://near.jhuapl.edu/index.html.

Contact Susan Lendroth at (626)793-5100 ext. 214 or by e-mail at
tps.sl@planetary.org for more information about the Student Press
Conference, public event or the Society's Name the Craters contest.

Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded The Planetary
Society in 1980 to advance the exploration of the solar system and to
continue the search for extraterrestrial life.  Its 100,000 members
make it the largest space interest group in the world.

Linda Wong
The Planetary Society
65 N. Catalina Ave.
Pasadena, CA 91106-2301
Tel:  (626) 793-5100 ext. 236
Fax:  (626) 793-5528
E-Mail:  tps@planetary.org

===============
(6) A POTENTIAL SENSOR FOR FAINT PHOS?

From Bob Kobres <bkobres@uga.edu>

A potential sensor for, Earth-based, small-PHO and comet-trail detection?

bobk
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

http://www.space.com/space/ccd_revolution_000203.html

New Astronomical 'Eye' To Reveal the Unseen

By Wil Milan
Special to space.com
posted: 06:49 am EST
04 February 2000 

A new type of light sensor for use by the world's largest telescopes
promises to reveal objects never before seen or glimpsed only poorly.

The sensor, shown above and developed by a team led by Stephen Holland
at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California, is known as
a high-resistivity (or Hi-Rho) CCD, and it is particularly effective a
detecting a region of the light spectrum that eludes most current CCD
sensors.

The wavelength that is detectable by these new sensors is the portion
of infrared light with wavelengths between 0.8 and 1.1 microns, which
is well outside the range the human eye can see. Because these new
devices have the capability to "see" these wavelengths better than any
previous sensor, they promise to open a whole new window to the
universe.

FULL STORY AT http://www.space.com/space/ccd_revolution_000203.html
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Project history from:
http://www.lbl.gov/Publications/LDRD/1997/Phys.htm

===============
(7) A REVIEW OF COMET AND ASTEROID STATISTICS

T. Gehrels: A review of comet and asteroid statistics. EARTH PLANETS
AND SPACE, 1999, Vol.51, No.11, pp.1155-1161

UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA,TUCSON,AZ,85721

The statistics of Earth-approaching asteroids are first summarized, and
an enhanced frequency of objects smaller than 100 meters is noted.
Superposed on these random hazards may be a periodic one of new comets
due to galactic tides of the Oort Cloud with a period of 26-36 Myr
(Rampino, 1998). New asteroids and comets are being found evermore
frequently because new telescope-and-detector systems are coming on
line. These are intended primarily for the discovery of dangerous
objects, but a beginning has been made with the study of statistics of
main-belt asteroids. In addition to trans-Neptunian objects,
cis-Neptunian ''Centaurs'' are recognized, which may be a link in the
evolution of short-period comets and thereby contribute to the flux of
Earth approachers. With the new equipment coming on line, we are
beginning to see that the global hazard will be mostly quantified
within a few decades. We do see a shortage in astrometric follow up
fainter than about the 20th magnitude. Copyright 2000, Institute for
Scientific Information Inc.

===============
(8) HIGH-VELOCITY OBLIQUE IMPACT EXPERIMENTS

M. Yanagisawa*) & S. Hasegawa: Angular momentum transfer in oblique
impacts: Implications for 1989ML. EARTH PLANETS AND SPACE, 1999,
Vol.51, No.11, pp.1163-1171

*) UNIVERSITY OF ELECTROCOMMUN,1-5-1 CHOFUGAOKA,CHOFU,TOKYO
   1828585,JAPAN

We conducted 10 shots of high-velocity oblique impact experiments
(1.95-3..52 km/s) using nylon projectiles and spherical mortar targets.
Large craters were formed, but these targets were not disrupted by the
impacts. We then calculated the efficiencies of momentum transfer from
the projectile to the post-impact target for each experiment. The
efficiencies of angular momentum transfer from the translational motion
of the projectiles to the rotation of the post-impact targets were also
derived. A representative efficiency of angular momentum transfer was
calculated to be 0.17 for random successive collisions. The efficiency
was applied to an equation expressing the precession angle of
asteroids. It is shown that 1989ML, target of Japan-US
asteroid-sample-return-mission (MUSES-C) would be tumbling. Copyright
2000, Institute for Scientific Information Inc.

=========================
(9) JAPANESE CONTRIBUTION TO METEOROID & DEBRIS MEASUREMENT

H. Yano: Japanese contribution to in-situ meteoroid and debris
measurement in the near Earth space. EARTH PLANETS AND SPACE, 1999,
Vol.51, No.11, pp.1233-1246

INSTITUE OF SPACE & ASTRONAUT SCI,PLANETARY SCI DIV,3-1-1
YOSHINODAI,SAGAMIHARA,KANAGAWA 229851,JAPAN

This paper reviews major results of present studies and recent
developments for future missions in the Japanese space program
regarding in-situ measurement and collection of micrometeoroids
and orbital debris in the near Earth space. Japan's contribution in
this area began with the post flight impact analysis of the Space Flyer
Unit (SFU) satellite which was returned to Earth in 1996 after 10-month
exposure in space. Despite a decade later than similar efforts first
conducted in the USA and Europe, it resulted in a record of over 700
hypervelocity impact signatures, which now forms the nation's first
database of real space impacts being open to public in the Internet.
Together with laboratory impact tests, both morphological and elemental
analyses of the impact craters yielded new insights of the meteoroid to
debris ratio as well as flux variation compared with the previous
spacecraft. The next step was a passive aerogel exposure in the STS-85
shuttle mission in 1997. No hypervelocity impact was found there but
its experience has been incorporated for designing a microparticle
collector to be on-board the Japan Experiment Module-Exposed Facility
of the International Space Station. All of such ''passive'' collection
of micro-impact features, however, still leave the significant
uncertainty in the quest of their origins. Therefore an aerogel-based
''hybrid'' dust collector and detector (HD-CAD) is currently under the
development. It measures time of impact and deduces impactors'
orbital and physical parameters by detecting impact flash while still
capturing them intact. The system is suitable for both (1) sample
return missions in LEO as well as to parent bodies of meteoroids, i.e.,
comets and asteroids, and (2) one-way mission to where the thermal and
plasma environment is such that impact induced plasma detectors may
suffer from significant noise, e.g., a Mercury orbiter and a solar
probe. Together with unambiguous dust samples from a comet by STARDUST
and an asteroid by MUSES-C as references, the HD-CAD in the LEO will be
able to deduce the accretion rates of the cometary and asteroidal dust
grains on the Earth. Copyright 2000, Institute for Scientific
Information Inc.

===============
(10) E-NTERVIEW WITH DAVID RAUP

From Robert Clements <Robert.Clements@dva.gov.au>

The following interview was publicised on a mailing list specialising in
the dinosauria; & it's link & text are FWDed in case the piece is of
interest to the CCNet....

All the best,
Robert Clements <Robert.Clements@dva.gov.au>

-------
Subject: David Raup
From: "Steve Brusatte" <dinoland@mailcity.com>
To: dinosaur@usc.edu

For all of those interested:

I recently interviewed the renowned paleontologist Dr. David Raup. Raup
is best known for his theory that mass extinctions occur periodically
every 26 million years. He was also once called the world's most
brilliant paleontologist by Stephen Jay Gould. Recently he has been
enjoying himself by relaxing on his Lake Michigan island, but took the
time to recall his long career with me.

I have posted this interview on my website, and you can find it at:
<http://www.geocities.com/stegob/davidraup.html>

Check it out,
Steve

===============
(11) DID ICE AGE CULTURES LOSE TECHNOLOGICAL SKILLS ?

From Bob Kobres <bkobres@uga.edu>

If this find proves to be of strong fabric, it REALLY begs the
questions: What happened?! Why the loss of knowledge?

Searching for threads.
bobk

From:
http://www.eurekalert.org/releases/uiuc-iac020100.html

Ice Age clothing said to be more advanced than previously thought

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Archaeologists have discovered what the well-dressed
Ice Age woman wore on ritual occasions. Her outfit, however, including
accessories, doesn't resemble anything Wilma Flintstone ever wore, or,
for that matter, any of our carved-in-stone conceptions of
"paleofashion."

Instead, the threads of at least some Ice Age women included caps or
snoods, belts and skirts, bandeaux (banding over the breasts) and
bracelets and necklaces -- all constructed of plant fibers in a great
variety of cloth, from twined and basket wear to plain weaves. While
styling varied across Eurasia, the finest weaves are "comparable to not
only Neolithic but even later Bronze and Iron Age products, or, in
fact, to thin cotton and linenwear worn today," Olga Soffer, James
Adovasio and David Hyland wrote in an article to be published in
Current Anthropology.

The evidence for Ice Age summer fashions comes in part from 80 textile
impressions Soffer found on tiny clay fragments in the Czech Republic.
The impressions are "the earliest evidence for cordage and textile
production in the world and reflect technologies heretofore associated
with much later periods," the archaeologists wrote. Soffer, a professor
of anthropology at the University of Illinois and a pioneer in the
study of Upper Paleolithic life ways, compared the impressions to the
representation of clothing on the so-called "Venus" figurines, which
also date to the Gravettian period, roughly 25,000 years ago. "It
suddenly struck us that what we were looking at under the microscope on
these little fragments was precisely what was being shown as clothing
on some of these 'naked ladies,' " she said, noting that in all
likelihood the Ice Age seamstresses also carved the figurines that
showed off their "exquisitely detailed" weaving, plaiting and coiling
skills.

FULL STORY at http://www.eurekalert.org/releases/uiuc-iac020100.html

================
(12) AND FINALLY: EAU D'ASTEROID - WHAT A STINKER

From Duncan Steel <D.I.Steel@salford.ac.uk>

New Scientist, 4 February 2000
http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns2224183

EAU D'ASTEROID  It's "futuristic" "atmospheric" "sulphurous" "smoky" 
"metallic" and "like gunpowder". It must be the latest fragrance? Yes!
It's Cyba, and it smells like a meteorite...

Smells from outer space

Paris: A bizarre fragrance that smells of meteorites has been developed
by British perfume experts, New Scientist reports.

The odour, called Cyba, smells "sulphurous, smoky, like gunpowder,
metallic", according to Mr Les Small, senior perfumer with Quest
International in Kent.

The "futuristic, atmospheric" perfume, devised to show that the firm
can emulate the smell of pretty much anything, was developed by
analysing the smell given off by molecules of carbonaceous chondrite,
the commonest mineral found on meteorites.

Copyright 2000, New Scientist

=============================
* LETTERS TO THE MODERATOR *
=============================

IS A VOLCANOE-TRIGGERED DARK AGE INEVITABLE?

From Michael Martin-Smith <martin@miff.demon.co.uk>

I had the good luck to catch tonight's transmission of the BBC 2
Horizon documentary on magma chambers and supervolcanoes, and noted 
comments by Professor Rampino on Yellowstone and the Toba (sic?)
eruption of 74,000 years ago in the Java sea.

As I understood matters, these supervolcanoes have the potential to
essentially destroy the complex web of our civilization, both by
regional massive destruction, and by global climatic changes with
agricultural wasting over several years - a situation likely to kill
billions and impoverish more. On top of this of course we would have to
add epidemics, explosive growth of vermin ( rodents, cockroaches etc)
and psycho-social collapse/regression - all unquantifiable at this time
but highly pertinent.

I am sure we could agree that, even given prior notice, we could not
expect to prevent such an event nor yet survive it in culturally or
biologically significant numbers. The resurrection of a culturally
dynamic liberal civilization based on humanistic values of Liberty and
Opportunity, and with it our potential for further scientific
technological and mental development, would surely be aborted for a
Dark Age of unimaginable length and horror.

This being so and since, as was made abundantly clear, Yellowstone is
certain to bring this about, albeit at an unknowable future date, it
follows logically (to me, at least) that our only realistic option is
to ensure that such an event fails to capture all or most of Humanity
within its compass.

In plain language, a human Diaspora into Space remains the best-indeed
the only viable - option for our species if we are to continue useful
development. Human evolutionary cosmic Destiny  must, indeed, become a
creed of the New Millennium in preference to currently fashionable
notions of Limits to Growth or "Green" Statism, if we are to face this
prospect with anything other than final despair.

We must build our future around a sense of Destiny and Diaspora, or be 
but a brief streak of Mind against the backdrop of a (mostly, so far as
we know) inanimate cosmos. Such, it seems to me, is the true import of
this programme. 

Dr Michael Martin-Smith

Working for a positive human future. Author of "Salto nello Spazio",
now published in Italy. Obtainable via http://www.zivago.com

----------------------------------------
THE CAMBRIDGE-CONFERENCE NETWORK (CCNet)
----------------------------------------
The CCNet is a scholarly electronic network. To subscribe/unsubscribe,
please contact the moderator Benny J Peiser <b.j.peiser@livjm.ac.uk>.
Information circulated on this network is for scholarly and
educational use only. The attached information may not be copied or
reproduced for any other purposes without prior permission of the
copyright holders. The fully indexed archive of the CCNet, from
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*

CCNet-ESSAY, 7 February 2000
----------------------------

NEOS, PLANETARY DEFENSE AND GOVERNMENT - A VIEW FROM THE PENTAGON

By Brigadier General S. Pete Worden <SimonP.Worden@pentagon.af.mil>

I'll begin my short CCNet-essay with a disclaimer. The US Department of
Defense (DoD) has no official view on the Near-Earth Object (NEO)
hazard. We have agreed to assist the overall United States effort led
by NASA with technology and observational support. Official disclaimers
out of the way, I'll provide my personal views in the remainder of the
essay. . . .


*

ANOTHER ASTEROID ON POTENTIAL IMPACT COURSE DISCOVERED

From Benny J Peiser <
b.j.peiser@livjm.ac.uk>

For the fifth time in two years, an near-Earth asteroid with the potential
to collide with Earth in the near future has been discovered. As Andrea
Milani from Pisa University reports (see his message to the MPML mailing
list below), the automatic close approach monitoring system of the NEODyS
system has detected a case of 'virtual impactor', i.e. an asteroid that has
a small but non-zero probability to hit the Earth in the next 20 years or
so.

Once again, the fact that this asteroid (2000 BF19) is currently rated as a
"O" on the Torino Scale, does not mean anything. The current impact
probability of 1 in a million can easily and quickly go up or down. In all
likelyhood, 2000 BF19 will drop altogether from the Scale - but until we get
peace of mind only further observations can provide us with the information
to assess the potential danger of this new PHA. Andrea Milani's public call
for such observations are thus more than justified.

Benny J Peiser

--------

ASTEROID 2000 BF 19

From Andrea Milani <milani@dm.unipi.it>
Sent: 07/02/00 17:41

The automatic close approach monitoring system, set up as an
additional service to the NEODyS system, has detected a case of
'virtual impactor', that is an asteroid for which the presently
available observations are not enough to allow us to exclude a future
impact. This happens at a probability level of roughly one in a
million, in the year 2022, and the asteroid is much less than one
kilometer in diameter, thus this should not be rated as a serious
concern (the rating in the Torino risk scale is still 0). The impact
could result by passing through a keyhole in the 2011 close approach;
the encounters would then repeat every 11 years, in a typical case of
'resonant return'.

Nevertheless, shame on the astronomical community if we lose this
dangerous fellow, which is unfortunately quite dim and fading.  The
asteroid is named 2000 BF19. Ephemerides for this object can be found
from NEODyS at

http://newton.dm.unipi.it/neodys/

and some are reported below here.

I would appreciate the collaboration of those among you who have the
capability of observing at magnitudes between 21 and 22; note that the
last observation was from the Italian amateur site S. Marcello
Pistoiese (but Boattini rated it as a lucky shot, with especially good
seeing conditions for our sky).

I apologize for sending out this message without all the necessary
documentation, which will be provided later to allow other orbit
computers to check our computations, but this object is visible
tonight and is fading, so I rate this message as scientifically
urgent.

Andrea Milani

Ephemerides for 2000BF19:

Observatory code 500

    Date      Hour    Equat. coord. (RA and DEC)  Mag  Elong Phase Glat
R     Delta   App mot(deg/d)       Sky plane error   
             (UTC)     h  m  s        d  '  "          (deg) (deg) (deg)
(AU)    (AU)     RA     DEC       Err1      Err2    PA
=========== ======  =============  ============ ===== ===== ===== =====
======= ======= ======= =======  ========  ======== =====
  7 Feb 2000 18.000    8 17 42.199  +20 28 56.44  21.3 163.7   8.6  27.8
1.8552  0.8878 -0.4899  0.0268    2.617"    0.804"  68.2
  7 Feb 2000 20.000    8 17 32.404  +20 29  4.46  21.3 163.6   8.7  27.8
1.8550  0.8878 -0.4895  0.0266    2.732"    0.817"  68.2
  7 Feb 2000 22.000    8 17 22.618  +20 29 12.41  21.3 163.4   8.7  27.7
1.8547  0.8878 -0.4891  0.0264    2.850"    0.831"  68.2
  8 Feb 2000  0.000    8 17 12.839  +20 29 20.30  21.3 163.3   8.8  27.7
1.8544  0.8878 -0.4887  0.0262    2.971"    0.845"  68.3
  8 Feb 2000  2.000    8 17  3.068  +20 29 28.12  21.3 163.2   8.8  27.7
1.8541  0.8878 -0.4883  0.0260    3.095"    0.859"  68.3
  8 Feb 2000  4.000    8 16 53.306  +20 29 35.87  21.3 163.1   8.9  27.6
1.8538  0.8878 -0.4879  0.0257    3.222"    0.872"  68.4
  8 Feb 2000  6.000    8 16 43.551  +20 29 43.56  21.3 163.0   9.0  27.6
1.8536  0.8878 -0.4875  0.0255    3.353"    0.886"  68.4
  8 Feb 2000  8.000    8 16 33.805  +20 29 51.18  21.3 162.8   9.0  27.6
1.8533  0.8878 -0.4871  0.0253    3.486"    0.900"  68.5
  8 Feb 2000 10.000    8 16 24.067  +20 29 58.74  21.3 162.7   9.1  27.5
1.8530  0.8878 -0.4867  0.0251    3.623"    0.915"  68.5
  8 Feb 2000 12.000    8 16 14.338  +20 30  6.22  21.3 162.6   9.2  27.5
1.8527  0.8878 -0.4863  0.0248    3.763"    0.929"  68.6
  8 Feb 2000 14.000    8 16  4.618  +20 30 13.64  21.3 162.5   9.2  27.5
1.8525  0.8878 -0.4858  0.0246    3.906"    0.943"  68.6
  8 Feb 2000 16.000    8 15 54.906  +20 30 21.00  21.3 162.4   9.3  27.4
1.8522  0.8879 -0.4854  0.0244    4.052"    0.957"  68.7
  8 Feb 2000 18.000    8 15 45.203  +20 30 28.28  21.3 162.2   9.4  27.4
1.8519  0.8879 -0.4849  0.0242    4.202"    0.972"  68.8
  8 Feb 2000 20.000    8 15 35.509  +20 30 35.50  21.3 162.1   9.4  27.4
1.8516  0.8879 -0.4845  0.0240    4.354"    0.986"  68.8
  8 Feb 2000 22.000    8 15 25.823  +20 30 42.65  21.3 162.0   9.5  27.3
1.8513  0.8879 -0.4840  0.0237    4.510"    1.001"  68.9
  9 Feb 2000  0.000    8 15 16.147  +20 30 49.74  21.3 161.9   9.6  27.3
1.8511  0.8879 -0.4836  0.0235    4.670"    1.015"  69.0
  9 Feb 2000  2.000    8 15  6.481  +20 30 56.76  21.3 161.7   9.6  27.2
1.8508  0.8879 -0.4831  0.0233    4.833"    1.030"  69.0
  9 Feb 2000  4.000    8 14 56.823  +20 31  3.71  21.3 161.6   9.7  27.2
1.8505  0.8880 -0.4826  0.0231    4.999"    1.045"  69.1
  9 Feb 2000  6.000    8 14 47.175  +20 31 10.59  21.3 161.5   9.7  27.2
1.8502  0.8880 -0.4822  0.0228    5.169"    1.060"  69.2
  9 Feb 2000  8.000    8 14 37.537  +20 31 17.40  21.4 161.4   9.8  27.1
1.8499  0.8880 -0.4817  0.0226    5.342"    1.075"  69.2
  9 Feb 2000 10.000    8 14 27.908  +20 31 24.15  21.4 161.3   9.9  27.1
1.8497  0.8880 -0.4812  0.0224    5.518"    1.090"  69.3
  9 Feb 2000 12.000    8 14 18.289  +20 31 30.83  21.4 161.1   9.9  27.1
1.8494  0.8881 -0.4807  0.0222    5.698"    1.105"  69.4
  9 Feb 2000 14.000    8 14  8.680  +20 31 37.44  21.4 161.0  10.0  27.0
1.8491  0.8881 -0.4802  0.0219    5.882"    1.120"  69.5
  9 Feb 2000 16.000    8 13 59.081  +20 31 43.98  21.4 160.9  10.1  27.0
1.8488  0.8881 -0.4797  0.0217    6.069"    1.135"  69.5
  9 Feb 2000 18.000    8 13 49.491  +20 31 50.46  21.4 160.8  10.1  27.0
1.8485  0.8882 -0.4792  0.0215    6.260"    1.150"  69.6
  9 Feb 2000 20.000    8 13 39.912  +20 31 56.87  21.4 160.7  10.2  26.9
1.8482  0.8882 -0.4787  0.0212    6.454"    1.165"  69.7
  9 Feb 2000 22.000    8 13 30.343  +20 32  3.21  21.4 160.5  10.3  26.9
1.8480  0.8882 -0.4782  0.0210    6.652"    1.181"  69.7
10 Feb 2000  0.000    8 13 20.785  +20 32  9.48  21.4 160.4  10.3  26.9
1.8477  0.8883 -0.4777  0.0208    6.854"    1.196"  69.8
10 Feb 2000  2.000    8 13 11.237  +20 32 15.68  21.4 160.3  10.4  26.8
1.8474  0.8883 -0.4771  0.0206    7.059"    1.211"  69.9
10 Feb 2000  4.000    8 13  1.699  +20 32 21.82  21.4 160.2  10.4  26.8
1.8471  0.8884 -0.4766  0.0203    7.268"    1.227"  70.0
10 Feb 2000  6.000    8 12 52.172  +20 32 27.89  21.4 160.0  10.5  26.8
1.8468  0.8884 -0.4761  0.0201    7.481"    1.242"  70.0
10 Feb 2000  8.000    8 12 42.656  +20 32 33.89  21.4 159.9  10.6  26.7
1.8466  0.8884 -0.4755  0.0199    7.698"    1.258"  70.1
10 Feb 2000 10.000    8 12 33.151  +20 32 39.82  21.4 159.8  10.6  26.7
1.8463  0.8885 -0.4750  0.0197    7.918"    1.274"  70.2
10 Feb 2000 12.000    8 12 23.656  +20 32 45.68  21.4 159.7  10.7  26.7
1.8460  0.8885 -0.4744  0.0194    8.142"    1.289"  70.3
10 Feb 2000 14.000    8 12 14.173  +20 32 51.47  21.4 159.6  10.8  26.6
1.8457  0.8886 -0.4739  0.0192    8.371"    1.305"  70.3
10 Feb 2000 16.000    8 12  4.701  +20 32 57.20  21.4 159.4  10.8  26.6
1.8454  0.8887 -0.4733  0.0190    8.603"    1.321"  70.4
10 Feb 2000 18.000    8 11 55.240  +20 33  2.86  21.4 159.3  10.9  26.6
1.8451  0.8887 -0.4728  0.0187    8.838"    1.337"  70.5



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Andrea Milani
Dipartimento di Matematica
Via Buonarroti 2
56127 PISA ITALY

tel. +39-050-844254 fax +39-050-844224
cellular phone +39-0329-8124014
E-mail: milani@dm.unipi.it
WWW: http://copernico.dm.unipi.it/~milani/homemilani.html
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CCCMENU CCC for 2000

The content and opinions expressed on this Web page do not necessarily reflect the views of nor are they endorsed by the University of

The content and opinions expressed on this Web page do not necessarily reflect the views of nor are they endorsed by the University of Georgia or the University System of Georgia.