PLEASE NOTE:


*

CAMBRIDGE-CONFERENCE DIGEST, 31 March 1998
------------------------------------------

(1) HOW TO DO A BETTER JOB NEXT TIME
    Richard Binzel <rpb@astron.mit.edu>

(2) GERVASE, FIVE GENTLEMEN FROM KENT & THE MOON
    Peter Snow <psnow@esi.co.nz> wrote:

(3) THE NEAR SCIENCE DATA CENTER
    K.J. Heeres et al., John Hopkins University

(4) NEAR MAGNETIC FIELD INVESTIGATION
    D.A. Lohr et al., John Hopkins University

(5) THE NEAR LASER ALTIMETER
    T.D. Cole et al., John Hopkins University

==========================
(1) HOW TO DO A BETTER JOB NEXT TIME

From: Richard Binzel <rpb@astron.mit.edu>

Dear Benny,

While there has been focus on "what went wrong" with the public
announcement of 1997 XF11, it may be best to focus on how to do a
better job the next time. Below I present for discussion an axiom for
public communication about new discoveries for which a collision with
the Earth cannot be ruled out.

Sincerely,
Richard P. Binzel
Associate Professor of Planetary Science
M.I.T.

--------------------------------------------------------------------
"A public statement regarding an Earth approaching object for which
a collision cannot be ruled out should not be issued without:

     a) Giving a quantitative value for the probability;
     b) Having independent verification on this probability;
     c) Placing this probability into the context of the
        collision probability with the background population
        of similar-sized objects."

============================
(2) GERVASE, FIVE GENTLEMEN FROM KENT & THE MOON

From: Peter Snow <psnow@esi.co.nz> wrote:

Dear Brad,

I have an interest in Gervase's five Kentish gentlemens observations and
Hartungs interpretation of them. In the Antipodes the Maori traditions,
Rock Art, Poems and placenames would suggest they saw a similar event
during the same time period albeit without the explosive description.
This event was attributed to anihilating the Moa Hunter along with the
Moa`s and Forests. 

Why I reply is that I have communicated with Mark Bailey re the
positions of the moon in both places on that date. He kindly did a
retrospective computor analysis which to me clearly shows that the moon
in it's first day phase (Maori Whiro) was as Gervase described. I
wonder if you or Mark could comment on this apparent anomaly.

Peter Snow

============================
(3) THE NEAR SCIENCE DATA CENTER

K.J. Heeres, D.B. Holland, A.F. Cheng: The NEAR Science Data Center,
SPACE SCIENCE REVIEWS, 1997, Vol.82, No.1-2, pp.283-308

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, APPLIED PHYSICS LAB, JOHNS HOPKINS
RD, LAUREL, MD, 20723

The NEAR (Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous) Science Data Center (SDC)
serves as the central site for common data processing activities needed
by the NEAR science teams in particular and the scientific community in
general. The SDC provides instrument and spacecraft data to the science
teams from around the world and redistributes science products produced
by those teams, all the science teams to focus on analysis. This data
and the accompanying documentation are available at
'http://sd-www.jhuapl.edu/NEAR/'. In addition the SDC is responsible
for archiving spacecraft, instrument, and science data to the Planetary
Data System (PDS). Copyright 1998, Institute for Scientific Information
Inc.

===================
(4) NEAR MAGNETIC FIELD INVESTIGATION

D.A. Lohr*), L.J. Zanetti, B.J. Anderson, T.A. Potemra, J.R. Hayes,
R.E. Gold, R.M. Henshaw, F.F. Mobley, D.B. Holland: NEAR magnetic field
investigation, instrumentation, spacecraft magnetics and data access,
SPACE SCIENCE REVIEWS, 1997, Vol.82, No.1-2, pp.255-281

*) JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY,APPLIED PHYSICS LAB, JOHNS HOPKINS RD,
   LAUREL, MD, 20723

The primary objective of the investigation is the search for a
body-wide magnetic field of the near Earth asteroid Eros. The Near
Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) 3-axis fluxgate magnetometer includes
a sensor mounted on the high-gain antenna feed structure. The NEAR
Magnetic Facility Instrument (MFI) is a joint hardware effort between
GSFC and APL. The design and magnetics approach achieved by the NEAR
MFI effort entailed low-cost, up-front attention to engineering
solutions which did not impact the schedule. The goal of the
magnetometer is reliable magnetic field measurements within 5 nT, which
necessitates the use of an extensive spacecraft magnetic interference
model but is achievable with the full year's orbital data set. Such a
goal has been shown viable with recent in-flight calibration data and
comparisons to the WIND magnetometer data.. The NEAR MFI effort has
succeeded in providing magnetic field measurements for the first flight
in NASA's Discovery line. Copyright 1998, Institute for Scientific
Information Inc.

===========================
(5) THE NEAR LASER ALTIMETER

T.D. Cole*), M.T. Boies, A.S. ElDinary, A. Cheng, M.T. Zuber, D.E.
Smith: The Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous laser altimeter, SPACE
SCIENCE REVIEWS, 1997, Vol.82, No.1-2, pp.217-253

*) JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, APPLIED PHYSICS LAB, DEPARTMENT OF
   SPACE, JOHNS HOPKINS RD, LAUREL, MD, 20723

In 1999 after a 3-year transit, the Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous
(NEAR) spacecraft will enter a low-altitude orbit around the asteroid,
433 Eros. Onboard the spacecraft, five facility instruments will
operate continuously during the planned one-year orbit at Eros. One of
these instruments, the NEAR Laser Rangefinder (NLR), will provide
sufficiently high resolution and accurate topographical profiles that
when combined with gravity estimates will result with quantitative
insight into the internal structure, rotational dynamics, and evolution
of Eros. Developed at the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), the NLR
instrument is a direct-detection laser radar using a bistatic
arrangement. The transmitter is a gallium arsenide (GaAs) diode-pumped
Cr:Nd:YAG (1.064-mu m) laser and the separate receiver uses an extended
infrared performance avalanche-photodiode (APD) detector with 7.62-cm
clear aperture Dall-Kirkham telescope. The lithium-niobate (LiNbO3)
Q-switched transmitter emits 15-ns pulses at 15.3 mJ pulse(-1),
permitting reliable NLR operation beyond the required 50-km altitude.
With orbital velocity of 5 m s(-1) and a sampling rate of 1 Hz, the NLR
spot size provides high spatial sampling of Eros along the orbital
direction. Cross-track sampling, determined by the specific orbital
geometry with Eros, defines the resolution of the global topographic
model; this spacing is expected to be <500 m on the asteroid's surface.
Combining the various sources of range errors results with an overall
range accuracy of 6 m with respect to Eros' center-of-mass. The NLR
instrument design, perfomance, and validation testing is decribed. In
addition, data derived from the NLR are discussed. Using altimetry data
from the NLR, we expect to estimate the volume of 433 Eros to 0.01% and
its mass to 0.0001% accuracies; significantly greater accuracies than
ever possible before Copyright 1998, Institute for Scientific
Information Inc.

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