PLEASE NOTE:


*

CCNet, 56/2000 - 10 May 2000
----------------------------


     "Professor Dyson has criticised science for concentrating too much
     technology on 'making toys for the rich' such as cellular phones
     and ever-smaller laptop computers. Instead, he says, science
     should be spreading knowledge, well being and wealth around the
     world so that one day 'every Egyptian village can be as wealthy as
     Princeton'. [...] Science and religion he said are two windows
     that people look through, trying to understand the big Universe
     outside, trying to understand why we are here. The two windows
     give different views, but both look out at the same Universe. Both
     views are one-sided; neither is complete. Both leave out essential
     features of the real world. And both are worthy of respect. 'I am
     saying to modern scientists and theologians: don't imagine that
     our latest ideas about the Big Bang or the human genome have
     solved the mysteries of the Universe or the mysteries of life’."
           -- David Whitehouse, BBC News Online


(1) LOST ASTEROID DISCOVERED AFTER 89 YEARS
    Benny J Peiser <b.j.peiser@livjm.ac.uk>

(2) SOLAR UPS AND DOWNS
    NASA Science News <science.news@msfc.nasa.gov>

(3) Eta-AQUARIDS 2000
    Rainer Arlt <rarlt@aip.de>

(4) FREEMAN DYSON WINS TEMPLETON PRIZE FOR PROGRESS IN RELIGION
    BBC News Online, 9 May 2000

(5) ERUPTING THEIR COOL
    Oliver Morton <abq72@pop.dial.pipex.com>

(6) MISSILE SHIELD DEVELOPERS CONFIDENT ABOUT NEXT TESTS
    YAHOO! News, 9 May 2000

(7) ASSESSING NATURAL DISASTER RISKS & MITIGATION STRATEGIES
    H. Tamura et al., OSAKA UNIVERSITY

(8) THE GLOBAL SEISMIC ASSESSMENT PROGRAM
    D. Giardini, ETH HONGGERBERG

(9) THE GLOBAL SEISMIC HAZARD MAP
     D. Giardini et al., ETH HONGGERBERG

(10) WHEN HAZARD PROBABILITY BECOMES REALITY
     Z.W. Kundzewicz et al., POLISH ACAD SCI

(11) AUSTRALIAN NEO "SURVEY"
     Rob McNaught <rmn@aaocbn.aao.gov.au>

(12) ASTEROID 216 KLEOPATRA
     Robert Clements <Robert.Clements@dva.gov.au>

(13) LIST OF NEO FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATORIES
     Michael Paine <mpaine@tpgi.com.au>

(14) UNDER THE BOTTOM LINE: FANTASIES OF PLANETARY DEFENSE
     MSNBC, 4 May 2000


==========
(1) LOST ASTEROID DISCOVERED AFTER 89 YEARS

From Benny J Peiser <b.j.peiser@livjm.ac.uk>

Asteroid 719 Albert, which was first discovered in 1911 and had been
lost since, has been found again yesterday. According to IAU Circular
7420, an asteroidal object with unusual motion was first detected on
May 1 by J. A. Larsen and reobserved on May 3 and 6 by R. S. McMillan
and J. V. Scotti (of the Spacewatch NEO search programme at Kitt Peak).
The object was then followed-up on May 9 by M. Hicks and R. Fevig with
the 2.1-m Kitt Peak reflector.

Yesterday, Gareth Williams, the deputy director of the Minor Planet 
Center identified this object (which was designated 2000 JW8), with
asteroid (719) Albert. According Brian Marsden, asteroid (719) was
"the last 'lost' numbered minor planet. 

Next year (in September 2001), asteroid Albert will make a close approach
to the Earth when it will come as close as 0.286 AU.

For further information, see IAU Circular No. 7420 at
http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/iauc/07400/07420.html#Item1

or contact Gareth Williams at GWILLIAMS@CFA.HARVARD.EDU

======================
(2) SOLAR UPS AND DOWNS

From NASA Science News <science.news@msfc.nasa.gov>

NASA Science News for May 9, 2000

The Sun appeared nearly featureless this weekend as the sunspot area
dropped 10 times below its average value. Nevertheless, scientists say
Solar Max is still on the way.

FULL STORY at
http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2000/ast09may_1m.htm

=================
(3) Eta-AQUARIDS 2000

From Rainer Arlt <rarlt@aip.de>

-------------------------------------
I M O   S h o w e r   C i r c u l a r
-------------------------------------

Eta-AQUARIDS 2000

The meteor shower of the eta-Aquarids is not easily observed from
mid-northern latitudes where the majority of visual observers is
located, because of the very late rising of the radiant before dawn,
and fewer amateurs are observing from the southern hemisphere where
dawn is much later, and the radiant climbs higher before the end of the
meteor watch.

It is therefore even more challenging to produce a meaningful activity
graph of the eta-Aquarids quickly after their maximum, and I am very
grateful for the immediate submission of the reports by the following
observers:

DAVMA  Mark Davis (USA)
JOHCA  Carl Johannink (the Netherlands)
LANMA  Marco Langbroek (the Netherlands)
LINMI  Mike Linnolt (USA)
MARAD  Adam Marsh (Australia)
MARPI  Pierre Martin (Canada)
MATMI  Michael Matiazzo (Australia)
MCLAL  Alex M'clintock (Spain)
MISKO  Koen Miskotte (the Netherlands)
MOSSC  Scott Moser (USA)
YOUKI  Kim Youmans (USA)

The gradual increase of activity is nicely show in the below Table. The
maximum time is, however, hard to fix because of a severe dip in the UT
morning of May 6 when the ZHR fell below half-value of its neighbours.
Maximum ZHRs appear to be at the lower end of previous years' typical
values of 60-70 per hour.

--------------------------------------------
Date   Time (UT)  Sol.  nETA  nObs <ZHR> +-
--------------------------------------------
Apr 29   1800    39.71    1    2     2.4 1.7
Apr 30   1640    40.63    2    1    20  11
May 01   1730    41.64   25    3    24   4.8
May 03   0050    42.90   23    4    36   6.1
May 04   0840    44.19   15    3    38   9.5
May 04   1750    44.56   14    4    50  13
May 05   1330    45.35   80    5    49   5.5
May 06   0530    46.00   12    5    24   6.8
May 06   1610    46.43  119    6    51   4.7
May 07   0530    46.96   19    4    25   5.7
--------------------------------------------

Solar longitudes refer to equinox J2000. Average times are given with
10-minute accuracy though often refer to many hours coverage. The
average ZHR was computed by <ZHR> = sum n / sum(Teff/C) where Teff is
the effective observing time, C is the total correction according to
limiting magnitude, possible field obstruction and radiant elevation
as sin(hR). The ZHR refers to a limiting magnitude of +6.5 and a
radiant elevation of 90 degrees. nETA is the number eta-Aquarids seen,
nObs is the number of observing periods contributing to the average;
the number of individual observers is smaller in most of the cases.

--
Rainer Arlt, 2000 May 08

Visual Commission - International Meteor Organization -- www.imo.net
rarlt@aip.de --  phone: +49-331-7499-533  --  fax: +49-331-7499-526

===================
(4) FREEMAN DYSON WINS TEMPLETON PRIZE FOR PROGRESS IN RELIGION

From the BBC News Online, 9 May 2000
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/sci/tech/newsid_740000/740688.stm

Scientist wins $1m religion prize

By BBC News Online science editor Dr David Whitehouse

Professor Freeman Dyson, one of the world's pre-eminent physicists, who
once said that theologians should be abolished, has won the 2000
Templeton Prize for progress in religion.

He received the award from Prince Philip at a ceremony in London on 9
May.

The citation says his futurist views have consistently challenged
mankind to reconcile technology and social justice, eliminating the
wedge that technology drives between the haves and have nots.

The award is given each year for outstanding originality in advancing
the world's understanding of God or spirituality. The prize of £600,000
($948,000) makes the Templeton one of the world's richest awards.

The award was started in 1972 by global investor Sir John Templeton to
remedy what he saw as an oversight by the Nobel Prizes, which do not
honour the discipline of religion. The award is always set at an amount
that exceeds the value of the Nobels.

Previous winners include the Rev Dr Billy Graham (1982), Aleksandr
Solzhenitsyn (1983), physicist Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker (1989),
and Benedictine monk and professor of astrophysics Stanley L. Jaki
(1987). The first winner was Mother Teresa in 1973.

Man of culture

In nominating Dyson for the prize, Dwight E.. Neuenschwander, professor
of physics at Southern Nazarene University in Oklahoma, described him
as "one of the outstanding physicists of our time".

He added that Dyson "has written extensively on the meaning of science
and its relation to other disciplines, especially religion and
ethics.... He is truly a man of a third culture that is in the making".

Freeman John Dyson, born in England in 1923 and an American citizen
since 1957, has long enjoyed a reputation as a writer with a knack for
turning intricate scientific theories into easily understood concepts.

His 1979 book, Disturbing the Universe, a "scientific autobiography",
describes in lay terms how a scientist looks at the world and is
regarded by many as an essential read for a professional scientist.

In another book, Imagined World's, he writes of distant timescapes
populated by our descendants spread throughout the galaxy in alliance
with other intelligent beings. They would be unrecognisable to us, he
says.

Science equal to religion

"Science is the most powerful driving force of change," he wrote in
Imagined Worlds. Religion, he says, "has at least an equal claim to
authority in defining human destiny". 

Indeed, he has said that the only two human institutions that can think
about the long-term development of mankind are science and religion.

Professor Dyson has criticised science for concentrating too much
technology on "making toys for the rich" such as cellular phones and
ever-smaller laptop computers.

Instead, he says, science should be spreading knowledge, well being and
wealth around the world so that one day "every Egyptian village can be
as wealthy as Princeton".

He says the reason for this is that pure scientists have become more
detached from the mundane needs of humanity, and the applied scientists
have become more attached to immediate profitability.

More respect

Responding to his award, Professor Dyson said that there should be more
respect and understanding between scientists and theologians.

Science and religion he said are two windows that people look through,
trying to understand the big Universe outside, trying to understand why
we are here.

The two windows give different views, but both look out at the same
Universe. Both views are one-sided; neither is complete. Both leave out
essential features of the real world. And both are worthy of respect.

"I am saying to modern scientists and theologians: don't imagine that
our latest ideas about the Big Bang or the human genome have solved the
mysteries of the Universe or the mysteries of life."

Copyright 2000, BBC

==================
(5) ERUPTING THEIR COOL

From Oliver Morton <abq72@pop.dial.pipex.com>

From NATURE NEWS SERVICE

By DAVID ADAM

The recent decade has been the warmest in the past 150 years, and 
climate models predict hotter times ahead. Another fraction of a degree
rise will nudge average temperatures beyond natural limits -- perhaps
convincing doubters of the need to cut greenhouse gases. But
researchers in Texas now predict the chances of a volcano cooling us
down again, muddying the global warming waters, are as high as one
in three.

The next few years are crucial to the global warming debate. Despite
soaring carbon dioxide levels and rising temperatures, only 22 nations
have currently ratified the 1997 Kyoto Protocol. The Kyoto treaty aims
to cut greenhouse-gas emissions from industrialized countries by five
per cent within twelve years, but is toothless without 55 ratifying
signatures.

Small island states and low-lying regions (with clearly the most to
lose) are fully signed-up to Kyoto. Developed nations are more
reluctant to take their foot of the gas and cut emissions, unless
emerging countries do likewise. The developing nations refuse, blaming
their advanced neighbours for the bulk of existing greenhouse gases.
While the squabbles continue, all have one eye on the rising average
temperature.

Climate models say that our warmer Earth can be blamed on human
activity, though some people argue that higher temperatures are
natural. Another increase would almost certainly show global warming
is man-made. "Studies suggest that the present climate is at the
uppermost limit of natural variability", say William Hyde and Thomas
Crowley of Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas. They
anticipate another increase of "0.1 to 0.3 degrees C in the next ten
to fifteen years", perhaps persuading countries to finally ratify
the Kyoto Protocol.

This is where volcanoes come in. Eruptions blast millions of tons of
sulphur dioxide gas high into the stratosphere, where it converts
to tiny droplets of sulphuric acid. These sulphate 'aerosols' reflect
the Sun's heat, cooling the Earth. The year 1816 is often referred to
as 'the year without a summer' due to freak summer frosts in the United
States and Europe -- linked to the Indonesian Tambora volcano erupting
the previous year.

Similar volcanic activity in the next decade could stop the mercury in
the thermometer bursting through the 'natural' ceiling into the
'man-made' danger zone. "[This] would likely confuse the debate about
temperature trends and impede detection of the climate change signal",
Hyde and Crowley say in the Journal of Climate1.

To determine the chances of this happening, the pair studied ice cores
bearing the scars of six centuries of volcanic activity. Each eruption
leaves a sulphate fingerprint in the ice, which Hyde and Crowley use to
predict climate-altering future eruptions -- and when they will occur.

Their conclusion: the probability of one such volcano blowing its top
in the next ten years is a reasonable 37%; the odds on two eruptions
fall to 15%. And they claim that the chances of a real whopper (that
would block about three times as much heat) are as high as one in five.

Predicting volcanoes is not an exact science -- Hyde and Crowley say
their forecasts provide a useful starting point but admit more data
will help to improve them. And if a major eruption does occur, it is
not guaranteed to produce cooling. Little temperature change followed
the 1982 eruption of El Chichón, Mexico, for example, perhaps because
the volcano is near the Equator or perhaps because of the El Niño
weather phenomenon.


1.Hyde, W. T. & Crowley, T. J. Probability of future climatically
significant volcanic eruptions. Journal of Climate 13, 1445-1450
(2000).

© Macmillan Magazines Ltd 2000 - NATURE NEWS SERVICE

==============
(6) MISSILE SHIELD DEVELOPERS CONFIDENT ABOUT NEXT TESTS

From YAHOO! News, 9 May 2000
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20000509/pl/missile_defense_2.html

Chief Speaks on Anti-Missile Defense

By ROBERT BURNS, AP Military Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Clinton may decide as early as this summer
whether to give a green light to constructing a national missile
defense, but the Air Force general leading the project said Tuesday it
would take four more years of testing before he would feel confident it
will work.

Lt. Gen. Ronald Kadish said the development of a national missile
defense - designed to shoot down a small number of missiles fired from
North Korea or the Middle East - is on the right track. He expressed
confidence that the next flight test of an interceptor rocket, 
scheduled for June, will be a success.

But Kadish, who directs the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization,
said there are so many technological milestones yet to be met that he
would not be confident about its effectiveness until production-model
rocket boosters and other advanced equipment are tested in 2004. Not
until that stage will the testing involve people who would actually be
operating a deployed system.

The rocket booster to be used in the June test is a prototype. The
production model will not be ready until 2003. "We're walking before we
run,"  Kadish said.

The June test is considered critical - at much from a political as a
technological standpoint - because it probably will be the last
attempted intercept before Clinton decides whether to push forward with
building the missile defense system. If Clinton leaves the decision to
his successor, the Pentagon would be unable to meet its self-imposed
deadline of having a missile defense operating by 2005.

That date coincides with the Pentagon's estimate of when North Korea
may have an initial capability to strike U.S. territory with a
nuclear-tipped ballistic missile.

The timetable is severely constrained because, in order to meet the
2005 target, construction on a new radar in the Aleutian Islands would
have to begin next April, Kadish said in an interview with Pentagon
reporters. Contracts for constructing the radar could not be awarded
until Clinton gives his go-ahead.

Kadish said he visited Shemya Island in the Aleutians, where the X-band
radar is to be built, last week.

"We're going to have a challenge to build that radar on this island,"
he said, not because of technology but because of the wind-swept
island's exceptionally short construction season.

Kadish said experts had solved the problem that caused the last missile
intercept test to fail in January - a plumbing problem that caused a
malfunction in sensitive devices aboard the missile interceptor that
enable it to "see" its target against the cold background of space.

"That particular problem, I think - barring a real stupid mistake - is
under control," Kadish said. "If we don't have one of those glitches,
we think the design we have will be successful on the next flight
test."

Still, the three-star general said he worried that another seemingly
minor problem could crop up at any time.

"One of the things I worry about a lot ... is that it's that one wire
that shakes loose in the system that prevents the test from being
successful, or it's that plug or the water molecule in the plumbing
system that gets you. It doesn't have to do with the fundamental design
so much as the complexity of the stuff we're building."

Most experts believe that if the June test fails to intercept its
target, Clinton will put off a deployment decision. Defense Secretary
William Cohen is scheduled to make his recommendation to Clinton this
summer.

The anti-missile system is designed to provide protection for all 50
states against a ballistic missile attack from a "rogue" nation. A base
with 20 interceptor rockets would be built in Alaska - most likely at
Fort Greely near Fairbanks - along with the X-band radar on Shemya
Island. By 2007, under the current schedule, the system would be
expanded to 100 interceptor rockets. The Pentagon estimates the cost at
$30 billion.

Copyright 2000, AP

==============
(7) ASSESSING NATURAL DISASTER RISKS & MITIGATION STRATEGIES

H. Tamura, K. Yamamoto, S. Tomiyama, I. Hatono: Modeling and analysis
of decision making problem for mitigating natural disaster risks.
EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF OPERATIONAL RESEARCH, 2000, Vol.122, No.2,
pp.461-468

*) OSAKA UNIVERSITY,GRAD SCH ENGN SCI,DEPT SYST & HUMAN SCI,1-3
   MACHIKANEYAMA,TOYONAKA,OSAKA 5608531,JAPAN

In this paper, we show that a value function under risk is useful to
model low probability and high consequence events like earthquakes for
which the expected utility theory is inadequate. First, we assume
alternatives to improve buildings, some scenarios of earthquakes, costs
to improve buildings, probability of death and injury and cost of
restoring the building's damage for each scenario. Then we show that
the value function under risk is an appropriate approach to model and
analyze a decision making process with low probability and high
consequence events. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

=============
(8) THE GLOBAL SEISMIC ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

D. Giardini: The Global Seismic Hazard Assessment Program (GSHAP) -
1992/1999. ANNALI DI GEOFISICA, 1999, Vol.42, No.6, pp.957-974

ETH HONGGERBERG,CHAIR SEISMOL & GEODYNAM,CH-8093
ZURICH,SWITZERLAND

The United Nations, recognizing natural disasters as a major threat to
human life and development, designed the 1990-1999 period as the
International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction (UN/IDNDR; UN Res.
42/169/ 1987). Among the IDNDR Demonstration Projects is the Global
Seismic Hazard Assessment Program (GSHAP), launched in 1992 by the
International Lithosphere Program (ILP) and implemented in the
1992-1999 period. In order to mitigate the risk associated to the
recurrence of earthquakes, the GSHAP promoted a regionally coordinated,
homogeneous approach to seismic hazard evaluation. To achieve a global
dimension, the GSHAP established initially a mosaic of regions and
multinational test areas, then expanded to cover whole continents and
finally the globe. The GSHAP Global Map of Seismic Hazard integrates
the results obtained in the regional areas and depicts
Peak-Ground-Acceleration (PGA) with 10% chance of exceedance in 50
years, corresponding to a return period of 475 years. All regional
results and the Global Map of Seismic Hazard are published in 1999 and
available on the GS HAP homepage on http://seismo.ethz.ch/GSHAP/.
Copyright 2000, Institute for Scientific Information Inc.

==========
(9) THE GLOBAL SEISMIC HAZARD MAP

D. Giardini*), G. Grunthal, K.M. Shedlock, P.Z. Zhang: The GSHAP Global
Seismic Hazard Map. ANNALI DI GEOFISICA, 1999, Vol.42, No.6,
pp.1225-1230

*) ETH HONGGERBERG,CHAIR SEISMOL & GEODYNAM,INST GEOPHYS,CH-8093
   ZURICH,SWITZERLAND

The Global Seismic Hazard Assessment Program (GSHAP), a demonstration
project of the UN/International Decade of Natural Disaster Reduction,
was conducted in the 1992-1998 period with the goal of improving global
standards in seismic hazard assessment. The GSHAP Global Seismic Hazard
Map has been compiled by joining the regional maps produced for
different GSHAP regions and test areas; it depicts the global seismic
hazard as Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) with a 10% chance of
exceedance in 50 years, corresponding to a return period of 475 years.
Copyright 2000, Institute for Scientific Information Inc.

=========
(10) WHEN HAZARD PROBABILITY BECOMES REALITY

Z.W. Kundzewicz*), K. Szamalek, P. Kowalczak: The Great Flood of 1997
in Poland. HYDROLOGICAL SCIENCES JOURNAL-JOURNAL DES
SCIENCES HYDROLOGIQUES, 1999, Vol.44, No.6, pp.855-870

*) POLISH ACAD SCI,RES CTR AGR & FOREST ENVIRONM,BUKOWSKA 19,PL-
   60809 POZNAN,POLAND

The flood that occurred in summer 1997 in Poland, affecting the
drainage basins of the Odra and the Vistula, caused 54 fatalities and
material losses of the order of billions of US$. The flood struck a
large part of the country and caused inundation of 665 000 ha of land.
The number of evacuees was 162 thousand. The rhetoric commonly used in
Poland refers to the Great Flood of 1997 as an event whose scale
exceeded all imagination about the possible size of the disaster.
Indeed, historic maxima of river stage and flow rate were considerably
exceeded. From the hydrological point of view, this flood was a very
rare event, with a return period in some river cross-sections of the
order of a thousand years and more. As this natural disaster, striking
a dynamically developing country-in-transition, attracted much
international interest, a holistic view of it is presented. Attempts to
answer the questions: 'Could the disaster have been avoided?' and 'What
lessons can be learnt from the flood?' are also made. Copyright 2000,
Institute for Scientific Information Inc.

=============================
* LETTERS TO THE MODERATOR *
=============================

(11) AUSTRALIAN NEO "SURVEY"

From Rob McNaught <rmn@aaocbn.aao.gov.au>

Duncan,

Whilst your comments on the word "survey" are correct, it isn't really
quite that clear cut. A TINY amount of surveying is being done on the
very few deep Schmidt films that are taken these days. I have
discovered the Amor asteroid 1999 RM28 and a couple of
high-eccentricity asteroids. So if q=1.23 is an NEA by your definition,
then one has been found. One LINEAR object (2000 FQ10 I think) was
independently discovered on the same day as LINEAR, but being second
counts for nothing. The trail was not measured as I believe the
photographic measures would make the orbit worse! Two comets were also
found last year.

However, your point is basically correct; no systematic search program
of any consequence is currently being undertaken and it would be wrong
to imply that one is. The southern part of the Catalina Sky Survey,
using the Uppsala Southern Schmidt will not begin until 2001.

Cheers, Rob

Robert H. McNaught
rmn@aaocbn.aao.gov.au

1999 RM28
Epoch 2000 Feb. 26.0 TT = JDT 2451600.5                 Williams
M  11.68226              (2000.0)            P               Q
n   0.40241470     Peri.  301.69948     +0.12810322     -0.92732348
a   1.8169940      Node   136.19236     +0.99089309     +0.13450462
e   0.3241164      Incl.   30.53038     -0.04147841     +0.34925588
P   2.45           H   16.6           G   0.15           U   4

From 47 observations 1999 Sept. 3-2000 Mar. 15, mean residual 0".50.
Orbital elements from MPC 39550.

============
(12) ASTEROID 216 KLEOPATRA

From Robert Clements <Robert.Clements@dva.gov.au>

216 Kleopatra has gone from being a strange little planet to a very,
very strange little planet with just four days of radar studies.

The MAster probe (Barucci et al; currently under assessment by ESA
under the Fleximissions 2/3 AofO) revives an idea first suggested for
CRAF; & uses a Mars gravity assist to pick up enough speed to achieve a
relatively slow flyby of one or more main belt asteroids (4
Vesta/alternate 21 Letitia in this case... targets for Mars windows in
2005, 7 & 9 have been considered, according to published summaries)..

Has anyone done the orbital numbers for a Earth/Mars/216 Kleopatra
trajectory to look for potential windows in the future?

All the best,
Robert Clements <Robert.Clements@dva.gov.au>

================
(13) LIST OF NEO FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATORIES

From Michael Paine <mpaine@tpgi.com.au>

Dear Benny,

I have started a list of observatories that are invovlved in NEO follow
up work. At this stage it is based on a search of Alta Vista (NEO
astrometry).

http://www1.tpgi.com.au/users/tps-seti/SG_links.html#followup

Suggestions for additions are welcome (or a link to a more complete
list).

regards
Michael Paine

==========================================================
(14) UNDER THE BOTTOM LINE: FANTASIES OF PLANETARY DEFENSE

From MSNBC, 4 May 2000
http://msnbc.com/news/402958.asp?cp1=1

NEW YORK, May 3 —  Parents and critics are pressing a unit of
publisher Simon & Schuster to reconsider releasing the Internet game
"Panty Raider," in which participants find models to strip them down
to their underwear to satisfy space aliens threatening to destroy
Earth.

FULL DISCLOSURE at
http://msnbc.com/news/402958.asp?cp1=1

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