PLEASE NOTE:


*

CCNet, 61/2000 - 24 May 2000
----------------------------


     "Our results document a very abrupt increase in eolian dust and
     Mesopotamian aridity, accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon
     dated to 4025 +/- 125 calendar yr B.P., which persisted for
     similar to 300 yr. [... ] the observed increase in mineral dust
     was derived from Mesopotamian source areas. Geochemical
     correlation of volcanic ash shards between the archeological site
     and marine sediment record establishes a direct temporal link
     between Mesopotamian aridification and social collapse,
     implicating a sudden shift to more arid conditions as a key factor
     contributing to the collapse of the Akkadian empire."
       
           -- H.M. Cullen et al., Climate change and the collapse of
              the Akkadian empire: Evidence from the deep sea


(1) NEW EVIDENCE FOR 4000 BP NATURAL DISASTER & CIVILISATION
    COLLAPSE
    H.M. Cullen et al., COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

(2) COMET IMPACT ON IO IN 1983?
    Larry Klaes <lklaes@bbn.com>

(3) WHILE NEO RESEARCHERS ARE COMPLACENT, U.S. ASTRONOMERS
    ARE LOBBYING FOR REAL MONEY
    Space.com, 19 May 2000

(4) ASTRONOMERS WANT BIGGER TELESCOPE - BUT NOT FOR SPACEGUARD
    BBC News Online, 22 May 2000

(5) RESTRICTED FUNDING FOR COMPREHENSIVE EARTH PROTECTION
    Bob Kobres <bkobres@uga.edu>

(6) MARTIAN METEORITE FOUND IN OMAN
    BBC News Online, 22 May 2000

(7) ASTEROID IMPACT TSUNAMI: A PROBABILISTIC HAZARD ASSESSMENT
    S.N. Ward and E. Asphaug

(8) VIRTUAL IMPACTORS: SEARCH AND DESTROY
    A. Milani et al., Dipartimento di Matematica, UniversitÓ di Pisa,
  
(9) STILL DOUBTING THE K/T MASS EXTINCTION EVENT
    G.C. Cadee, NETHERLANDS INST SEA RES

(10) DEATH OF THE DINOSAURS
     John Mosley <jmosley@earthlink.net>

(11) COMET 1997 K2 WOULD BE DISCOVERED TODAY
     Jeffrey Larsen <jlarsen@pirlmail.lpl.Arizona.EDU>

(12) GLOBAL URANIUM SUPPLY
     Joel Gunn <jdgunn@mindspring.com>

(13) CALL FOR ASTEROIDS III CHAPTERS
     William Bottke <bottke@ceres.tn.cornell.edu>


=========
(1) NEW EVIDENCE FOR 4000 BP NATURAL DISASTER & CIVILISATION
    COLLAPSE

H.M. Cullen*), P.B. deMenocal, S. Hemming, G. Hemming, F.H. Brown,
T. Guilderson, F. Sirocko: Climate change and the collapse of the
Akkadian empire: Evidence from the deep sea

*) COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY,LAMONT DOHERTY EARTH  
    OBSERV,PALISADES,NY,10964

GEOLOGY, 2000, Vol.28, No.4, pp.379-382

The Akkadian empire ruled Mesopotamia from the headwaters of the
Tigris-Euphrates Rivers to the Persian Gulf during the late third
millennium B.C. Archeological evidence has shown that this highly
developed civilization collapsed abruptly near 4170 +/- 150 calendar yr
B.P., perhaps related to a shift to more arid conditions. Detailed
paleoclimate records to test this assertion from Mesopotamia are rare,
but changes in regional aridity are preserved in adjacent ocean basins.
We document Holocene changes in regional aridity using mineralogic and
geochemical analyses of a marine sediment core from the Gulf of Oman,
which is directly downwind of Mesopotamian dust source areas and
archeological sites. Our results document a very abrupt increase in
eolian dust and Mesopotamian aridity, accelerator mass spectrometer
radiocarbon dated to 4025 +/- 125 calendar yr B.P., which persisted for
similar to 300 yr. Radiogenic (Nd and Sr) isotope analyses confirm that
the observed increase in mineral dust was derived from Mesopotamian
source areas. Geochemical correlation of volcanic ash shards between
the archeological site and marine sediment record establishes a direct
temporal link between Mesopotamian aridification and social collapse,
implicating a sudden shift to more arid conditions as a key factor
contributing to the collapse of the Akkadian empire. Copyright 2000,
Institute for Scientific Information Inc.

====================
(2) COMET IMPACT ON IO IN 1983?

From Larry Klaes <lklaes@bbn.com>

[as posted on jupiter_list@egroups.com]

"Has Jupiter Flashed before? Well, not Jupiter itself but its strange
Galilean satellite Io. On July 26, 1983, Io suddenly brightened by
about 50% for just under 2 minutes. The "flash" represented an emission
energy of 10^28 ergs, which is equivalent to the impact on the satllite
of an ice mass 5-kilometers in diameter moving at 60 km/sec. This
collision interpretation is encouraged by the 1994 impacts of cometary
fragments on Jupiter proper. In the case of Io, however, there is
another possibility: electrical arcing. Io's volcanoes are prodigious
spewers of metallic sodium [No they're not], and T. Gold has speculated
that colossal arcs may occur in this conducting environment as Io cuts
through Jupiter's magnetic field."

O'Brien, Roger; "Has Jupiter Flashed Before?" British Astronomical
Association, Journal, 104:6, 1994.

Quote from a webpage. URL:
http://science-frontiers.com/sf100/sf100a02.htm

Jason Perry
volcanopele@hotmail.com

----------
From Larry Klaes <lklaes@bbn.com>

Thank you, Jason. Any speculations on where the impact crater might be?
Or does Io change its surface fast enough between 1983 and when Galileo
starting imaging the moon in 1996 to erase such a crater?

Larry

-----------
From Jason Perry <volcanopele@hotmail.com>

Depends on where it landed. If it landed in the plains area or near a
volcano, it probably has been erased. If it landed on a mountain, it
probably has survived.  An its possible that an impact crater on Io
would soon look very much like a volcano. Io is probably so active that
a crater would do that. Then it would be hard to tell.

Impact craters have been observed on Io so some do last for a bit,
maybe a few thousand years.  The largest I have found is on a plateau 
west of Zal Patera.  Its around 8 km across. 5 others have also been
seen.  None have been found that would be large enough to account for
a 5 km wide comet.

Jason Perry
volcanopele@hotmail.com

====================
(3) WHILE NEO RESEARCHERS ARE COMPLACENT, U.S. ASTRONOMERS
    ARE LOBBYING FOR REAL MONEY

From Space.com, 19 May 2000
http://space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/new_observatories_000519.html

Astronomers call for new Space Observatories
                  
A team of leading U.S. astronomers wants NASA to spend $3.7 billion
during this decade to build and launch a series of new space-based
observatories. The astronomers say they need the instruments in order
to pin down a host of scientific mysteries, from the origin of the
universe to the formation of black holes to the possible existence of
Earth-like planets.

Years in the making, the report released today by the National Research
Council (NRC) lays out an ambitious plan for astronomy and astrophysics
through 2010. Team leader Christopher McKee, a University of California
at Berkeley astronomer, and Princeton University astronomer Joseph
Taylor, envision a new generation of both space- and ground-based
telescopes, as well as a National Virtual Observatory, which will
collect all astronomical data.

The report lists the missions from top to lowest priority, and excludes
some efforts on the wish lists of astronomers. "This is not just a
typical 'please send money' report," says William  Wulf, president of
the National Academy of Engineering and NRC vice chairman. "This
represents tough choices" made within the astronomy community.

The study urges NASA to consider a host of mission sizes, not just the
very large and the very small, which dominate the agency's planning.
While the team proposes four major space-based initiatives -- that is,
missions costing more than about $500 million -- it also recommends
five moderate initiatives, each with an average price tag of about $300
million. One panel member says that mid-sized missions today don't win
the support that the larger ones do, while smaller spacecraft are built
and flown under special programs like Explorer or Discovery.

Despite the study's call for NASA to provide more opportunities for
variety in mission size, NASA officials greeted the report 
enthusiastically; saying it largely matches the agency's plans for the
next decade. The top NRC priority, for example, is the Next Generation
Space Telescope, a $1 billion observatory with a mirror nearly four
times the size of the current Hubble Space Telescope. That future
mission already is high on NASA's to-do list. The effort will include
substantial contributions from the European Space Agency and the
Canadian Space Agency, and is slated for launch around 2007.

FULL STORY at
http://space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/new_observatories_000519.html

=====================
(4) ASTRONOMERS WANT BIGGER TELESCOPE - BUT NOT FOR SPACEGUARD

From the BBC News Online, 22 May 2000
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/sci/tech/newsid_758000/758883.stm

Astronomers want bigger telescopes

By BBC News Online science editor Dr David Whitehouse

If you are an American astronomer then the next decade may offer
unprecedented opportunities to study the Universe.

If you are an American taxpayer then you may wonder why hundreds of
millions of dollars are being spent on several large telescopes doing
essentially the same thing.

According to a new report by the National Science Foundation (Nsf)
looking at what astronomers require in the next decade or so, the
highest priority is a so-called Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST).

This would be far more advanced than the Hubble telescope currently in
orbit. The report says it should "dramatically increase our
understanding of how the first stars and galaxies formed billions of
years ago and how stars and planets form today.

FULL STORY at
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/sci/tech/newsid_758000/758883.stm


====================
(5) RESTRICTED FUNDING FOR COMPREHENSIVE EARTH PROTECTION

From Bob Kobres <bkobres@uga.edu>

.. added the URLs below to R.E. Gold’s Shield Report following the New Scientist
blurb.

http://www.niac.usra.edu/files/studies/abstract/75Gold.html

http://www.niac.usra.edu/files/studies/final_report/html/75Gold/75Gold.html 

Later.
bobk

--------
SHIELD: A COMPREHENSIVE EARTH PROTECTION SYSTEM
http://www.niac.usra.edu/files/studies/abstract/75Gold.html

Principal Investigator: Robert E. Gold

Organization or Academic Affiliation: The John Hopkins University
Applied Physics Laboratory
                                    
Abstract

Although the probability of a small body impact with Earth is low,
the greatest natural threat to the long-term survivability of
civilization is an asteroid or comet impact. To date, the
existence and orbits of a only few hundred near-Earth asteroids
and comets are known, many more are yet to be discovered. In
addition, limited resources are dedicated to expanding this
catalog. To protect the Earth against a collision, the asteroid
must be discovered and then deflected, or fragmented into pieces
that will miss the Earth or vaporize in Earth's atmosphere. The
problem involves both detection and elimination. Many studies have
examined particular portions of the problem of detecting and
protecting the Earth from approaching comets and asteroids.
However, there has been very little examination of the complete
Earth-protection problem. This proposal will study the
architecture of SHIELD, a comprehensive Earth-protection system,
with special emphasis on a non-nuclear method of small-body
deflection. This proposal will show that a non-nuclear system for
smaller threats can almost be built today and with projected
advancements in technology a complete system for the important
range of impactor sizes will be practical in a 40 year interval.

====================
(6) MARTIAN METEORITE FOUND IN OMAN

From The BBC News Online, 22 May 2000
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/sci/tech/newsid_759000/759267.stm

By BBC News Online science editor Dr David Whitehouse

A brownish grey stone weighing 1,056 grams (2.3 lbs) is thought to be
only the 15th known meteorite to originate from Mars.

The discovery, made on 24 January this year in the Dhofar region of
Oman, is extremely rare. Of the estimated 20,000 known meteorites, only
a handful are confirmed as having come from the Red Planet or the Moon.

Most come from the thousands of tiny, irregularly shaped worlds that
form the asteroid belt, which orbits the Sun between Mars and Jupiter.

It is not known who picked up this new rock, provisionally named Dhofar
019, which it seems is made from Martian basalt. Whoever it was is
staying anonymous - although it could be one of the professional
meteorite hunters that regularly scour the deserts for rocks from
space.

Analysis of the rock's mineralogy by scientists at the Vernadsky
Institute in Moscow and the University of Tennessee suggest that it
shows no signs of having been melted during its passage through the
Earth's atmosphere.

This is possibly because it is a fragment of a once larger meteorite..

Scientists say that it has been subject to considerable weathering on
Earth but it has similarities to the Martian meteorite designated
ALH84001, inside which some researchers believe is evidence of past
life on Mars.

Copyright 2000, BBC

==================
(7) ASTEROID IMPACT TSUNAMI: A PROBABILISTIC HAZARD ASSESSMENT

S.N. Ward and E. Asphaug: Asteroid impact tsunami: A probabilistic
hazard assessment. ICARUS, Volume 145, Number 1, May 2000, 64f.

We investigate the generation, propagation, and probabilistic hazard of
tsunami spawned by oceanic asteroid impacts. The process first links
the depth and diameter of parabolic impact cavities to asteroid
density, radius, and impact velocity by means of elementary energy
arguments and crater scaling rules. Then, linear tsunami theory
illustrates how these transient cavities evolve into vertical sea
surface waveforms at distant positions and times. By measuring maximum
wave amplitude at many distances for a variety of impactor sizes, we
derive simplified attenuation relations that account both for
geometrical spreading and frequency dispersion of tsunami on uniform
depth oceans. In general, the tsunami wavelengths contributing to the
peak amplitude coincide closely with the diameter of the transient
impact cavity. For the moderate size impactors of interest here
(those smaller than a few hundred meters radius), cavity widths are less
than or comparable to mid-ocean depths. As a consequence, dispersion
increases the 1/&squ;r long-wave decay rate to nearly 1/r for tsunami
from these sources. In the final step, linear shoaling theory applied
at the frequency associated with peak tsunami amplitude corrects for
amplifications as the waves near land. By coupling this tsunami
amplitude/distance information with the statistics of asteroid falls,
the probabilistic hazard of impact tsunami is assessed in much the same
way as probabilistic seismic hazard, by integrating contributions over
all admissible impactor sizes and impact locations. In particular,
tsunami hazard, expressed as the Poissonian probability of being
inundated by waves from 2 to 50 m in height in a 1000-year interval, is
computed at both generic (generalized geography) and specific (real
geography) sites. For example, a typical generic site with 180░ of
ocean exposure and a reach of 6000 km, admits a 1-in-14 chance of an
impact tsunami exceeding 2-m in height in 1000 years. The likelihood
drops to 1-in-35 for a 5-m wave, and to 1-in-345 for a 25-m wave.
Specific sites of Tokyo and New York have 1-in-24 and 1-in-47 chances,
respectively, of suffering an impact tsunami greater than 5 m in the next
millennium. (c) 2000: Academic Press

====================
(8) VIRTUAL IMPACTORS: SEARCH AND DESTROY

A. Milani, S.R. Chesley, A. Boattini,  Valsecchi, B. Giovanni: Virtual
Impactors: Search and Destroy. Icarus, Volume 145, Issue Icarus, pp.
12-24, May 2000.

*) Dipartimento di Matematica, UniversitÓ di Pisa, Pisa, Italy

If for an asteroid which has been observed only over a short arc and
then lost there are orbits compatible with the observations resulting
in collisions, recovery would be desirable to decide if it will
actually impact. If recovery is essentially impractical, as is the case
for many small asteroids in the 100- to 500-m-diameter range, the
next best thing is to make sure that the lost asteroid is not on a
collision course. We propose a method for achieving this guarantee,
with an observational effort far smaller than the one required for
recovery. The procedure involves the computation of an orbit that is
compatible with the available observations and, by hypothesis, results
in an impact at some later encounter; this we call a virtual impactor
(VI). The collision at some future time is a strong constraint; thus
the VI has a well determined orbit. We show that it is possible to
compute for each given time of observation the skyprint of the VI, that
is the set of astrometric positions compatible with an impact (or a
near impact). The skyprint needs to be scanned by powerful enough
telescopes to perform a negative observation; once this has been done
for the skyprints of all VIs, collisions can be excluded even
without recovery. We propose to apply this procedure to the case of the
lost asteroid 1998 OX4, for which we have found orbital solutions with
impacts in the years 2014, 2038, 2044, and 2046. Suitable observing
windows are found when the VI would be close to the Earth in 2001 and
in 2003, and the corresponding skyprints are small enough to be covered
with very few frames. This procedure might become more and more
necessary in the future, as the number of discoveries of small
potentially hazardous asteroids increases; we discuss the general
principles and the validation procedures that should apply to such
a VI removal campaign. (c) 2000: Academic Press

====================
(9) STILL DOUBTING THE K/T MASS EXTINCTION EVENT

G.C. Cadee: Mass mortalities and mass extinction
LETHAIA, 1999, Vol.32, No.4, pp.318-320

NETHERLANDS INST SEA RES,POB 59,NL-1790 AB DEN BURG,NETHERLANDS

Are mass mortality and mass extinction related? In an interesting
paper, Zinsmeister (1998) describes a 1-3 m thick sediment layer rich
in fish bones just above the K-T boundary on Seymour Island. According
to Zinsmeister this might 'represent the first documented, direct
evidence of a kill event associated with the bolide impact 65 m.y.
ago'. In this note I will discuss why I think it may not.
Copyright 2000, Institute for Scientific Information Inc.

==================
(10) DEATH OF THE DINOSAURS

From Ron Baalke <baalke@jpl.nasa.gov>

Forwarded from John Mosley (jmosley@earthlink.net)

Press Release

"Death of the Dinosaurs"
New Planetarium Show at Griffith Observatory

Premieres Wednesday, May 24, 2000

One of greatest scientific mysteries of all time - what happened to the
dinosaurs - was solved when it was realized that the earth was
clobbered by a giant asteroid or comet 65 million years ago. The impact
and the destruction caused by worldwide tidal waves, grass and forest
fires, and clouds that blocked sunlight for years, caused the
extinction of many of the worlds species - including the dinosaurs.
The disappearance of previously successful species paved the way for
the rise of mammals - and eventually us - in the age that followed.

This impact demonstrated in a dramatic way how the earth (and our
human destiny) is connected to the rest of the solar system.

"Death of the Dinosaurs," the new live multi-media planetarium show at
Griffith Observatory, uses the Zeiss star projector to show how comets
and asteroids can strike our planet and what happens when one does.
We've recently come to appreciate that such impacts are not things that
used to happen long ago, and that our earth remains vulnerable. The
show provides an updated assessment of the risk from asteroid and comet
impacts today, and it concludes with the latest thinking on answers to
the question, "What do we do to defend our planet to prevent a similar
catastrophe from happening to us?"

"Death of the Dinosaurs" is presented Tuesday through Sunday at 3:00
p.m. and 7:30 p.m., with additional shows at 4:30 p.m. on Saturdays
and Sundays, beginning tomorrow, Wednesday, May 24. There are no
planetarium shows on Mondays.

For additional information on Griffith Observatory programs and
activities, please call (323) 664-1191 for a recorded message or
visit the Observatory's web site at
http://www.GriffithObservatory.org.

=============================
* LETTERS TO THE MODERATOR *
=============================

(11) COMET 1997 K2 WOULD BE DISCOVERED TODAY

From Jeffrey Larsen <jlarsen@pirlmail.lpl.Arizona.EDU>

From CCNet, 22 May 2000:
> In a commentary accompanying the article, astronomer Michael A'Hearn of
> the University of Maryland said that the failed detection of the comet
> three years ago may be a sign that current search efforts are skewed
> towards asteroids 1 km (0.62 mi.) or larger in diameter, despite the
> fact there are likely many more smaller bodies that could wreak
> major damage if they struck the Earth.

Hi Benny,

I feel the need to add a comment. This was a failure in detection from
three years ago, and not from the "current search efforts".  Three
years ago, out of the relatively major (all sky coverage surveys), none
were in full operation yet (Spacewatch was, but it doesn't cover the
sky each lunation). In other words, most likely a 1-km object would
have escaped detection as well. I think the question more appropriately
should be would such an object, if it were in the sky this year, escape
the current system?

Working for a search group, I am the last person who would argue
against additional resources.  Obviously, we need to start pushing
faintward to complete the inventory to smaller and smaller objects. 
There is a balance, however, in what can be accomplished and what can
be accomplished with reasonable (or available) resources. 

Three years ago I started working for Spacewatch.  Since then, I have
seen nothing but a steady increase in capability of the search
programs. I have not the growth in search capability mentioned as a
variable in any comments regarding the theory of surveying. 

Regards,

Jeffrey Larsen

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Jeffrey A. Larsen                           jlarsen@lpl.arizona.edu
Spacewatch Project                              Telephone: (520) 621-2824
Lunar and Planetary Laboratory                  FAX:  (520) 621-1940
University of Arizona                                         
Tucson, Arizona 85721                   
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

================
(12) GLOBAL URANIUM SUPPLY

From Joel Gunn <jdgunn@mindspring.com>

Re: NOT ENOUGH URANIUM FOR NUCLEAR ENERGY?
    Jens Kieffer-Olsen <dstdba@post4.tele.dk> wrote:

> Forty years ago it was argued that known uranium reserves were too
> few to supply the world with energy for much more than 50 years.
> Since then new yellowcake deposits may have been discovered, but also
> breeder reactors have fallen from grace such that the yield per
> kilogram is reduced. Did the article provide an estimate of the
> period over which they envisage feeding 4000 reactors with
> fissionable uranium?

Someone on the combined NOVA-Frontline report of global warming about
two weeks ago reported that there was enough accessible uranium to
supply the world with electricity for about 40 years. The summation of
the program seemed to be that the world culture is headed for an energy
crisis regardless of any disturbances caused by global warming. I
believe the same person who reported the uranium supply said that
resolution of the energy problem was being handled in a "timid" manner.
An effort of similar scale to that required to put people on the moon
is required.

Joel Gunn

===================
(13) CALL FOR ASTEROIDS III CHAPTERS

From William Bottke <bottke@ceres.tn.cornell.edu>

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                         ASTEROIDS III
              CALL FOR CHAPTERS AND PARTICIPANTS
         (Response must by received by June 23, 2000)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dear Colleagues,

Since the publication of the Space Science Series Book "Asteroids II", our
understanding of small bodies in the solar system has made tremendous
progress.  In the last ten years, spacecraft have performed their first
reconnaissance of several main belt asteroids, while delay-Doppler radar
techniques and HST imaging have given us new tools to examine near-Earth
asteroids and large main belt bodies via remote sensing.  Hardware
advances in CCD technology now allow us detect and observe asteroids more
readily than before, such that our library of asteroid spectra has grown
exponentially.  In addition, theoretical advances and new computational
resources now allow us to numerically model complex systems much more
accurately than before, giving us a much clearer understanding of
processes such as asteroid collisions and orbital dynamics.

For these reasons,  the time has come to begin work on "Asteroids III",
a new book in the Space Science Series.  The goal of this book is to
establish the current state of the field (at the bicentennial of the first
asteroid's discovery) and to serve as a foundation for advancement over
the next decade.  A Scientific Organizing Committee (SOC) of more than 12
international members is forming and making plans for the organization and
content of this book. The editors of Asteroids III will be William Bottke,
Alberto Cellino, Paolo Paolicchi, and Richard Binzel.

The purpose of this message, sent on behalf of the Editors and the SOC, is
to invite you to volunteer to participate in the Asteroids III project.
More specifically, this message is a solicitation for ideas for chapter
topics and a solicitation for volunteers for chapter authors. If you would
like to recommend chapters for the book, or would like to volunteer to
write a particular chapter, we would like to hear from you no later than
June 23, 2000.  To be most helpful, and to be seriously considered for
selection as a chapter author, we need to receive detailed information as
outlined at the bottom of this e-mail.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

         INFORMATION FOR ASTEROIDS III CHAPTERS/AUTHORS

These sections explain the guidelines and conditions for filling out the
Asteroids III form below.


CHAPTER CATEGORIES

Broad categories under, which chapter topics fall, include the following:
o Asteroid cosmochemisty
o Asteroid spectroscopy/observations
o Asteroid families
o Asteroid search programs
o Asteroid collisions and impact processes
o Origins of asteroids
o Asteroid geology
o Asteroid sizes/albedos/taxonomy/radiometry
o Other

Chapters should address issues which were not discussed in Asteroids II or
those which are in need of a SIGNIFICANT update.  They should be of
general interest to the asteroid community -- please avoid narrow or
highly technical matters which would be better addressed in contributed
papers to scientific journals.  (Negotiations are underway for a special
issue of Icarus.)  We also hope, as much as possible, to select and
encourage emerging new voices in the field.


RESPONSIBILITY OF FIRST AUTHORS

In proposing to serve as a first author of a chapter, you agree to take
full responsibility for the content and on-time delivery of the chapter.
All editorial processing and typesetting (formerly the work handled by
Mildred Matthews) will be performed on a contract basis with an
independent agency that will have fixed deadlines and fixed costs. There
is simply zero flexibility in the process for late chapters. If you cannot
or will not deliver your chapter on time, your participation is not
desired.

In proposing to serve as a first author of a chapter, you also agree to be
solely responsible for page charges for your chapter.  You should expect
these charges to be in the vicinity of $75 per published page.  These
charges will support the typesetting and editorial production of the book
and help reduce the sales price of the book.  The goal is to keep the
sales price within easy reach of graduate students.

Additional information on the preparation of chapters will be distributed
to chapter authors at the time of selection.


CO-AUTHORS

The SOC and editors of Asteroids III intend to give the first author of
each chapter some latitude in choosing co-authors.  We invite you to
arrange your own collaborations, though the SOC and Editors may contact
you with specific suggestions before making final selections.  Therefore,
we request that your chapter proposal include a selection of potential
co-authors. Their job will be to help you write a more complete
description of your topic.  For this reason, it is requested that you
define the role that each co-author would have on your team.  The number
of added co-authors per chapter should not exceed two or three unless a
specific need for additional co-authors can be clearly demonstrated.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SELECTION OF CHAPTER TOPICS

The editors of Asteroids III have put together a scientific organizing
committee (SOC) whose job is to help the editors identify important topics
and potential lead authors across the asteroid community.  The editors and
the SOC intend to review the "at large" contributions derived from this
solicitation before making final chapter author/topic selections.  While
the SOC will have considerable input into the decision- making process,
the final call will be made by the editors.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

ASTEROIDS III MEETING

We hope to assign chapter authors over the next few months so they can
begin preparing for the "Asteroids 2001: From Piazzi to the 3rd
Millennium" meeting to be held 11-16 June 2001 in Palermo, Sicily. This
meeting will serve as the Asteroids III conference.

For meeting information contact: CERES2001@OAPA.ASTROPA.UNIPA.IT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

TIMESCALE FOR COMPLETION AND PUBLICATION OF ASTEROIDS III

First drafts of all chapters will be due at start of the Asteroids 2001
conference on June 11, 2001.  Final versions will be due on August 1, 2001.
All refereeing, final revisions, typesetting, and proofing will be completed
for a 2002 publication of Asteroids III.

Your participation would be an extremely valuable service to the asteroid
and planetary science community.  The deadline for responding to this
solicitation is June 23, 2000.

It is our intention to make Asteroids III as useful as Asteroids (1979)
and Asteroids II (1989), such that it becomes the science community's
primary reference manual for the next decade.

Best regards,

William Bottke
Editor, Asteroids III
Center for Radiophysics & Space Research
306 Space Sciences
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853-6801

Tel: (607) 255-3934
Fax: (607) 255-9002

- - - - - - - - - - - -  Cut Here - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
                     ASTEROID III PARTICIPATION FORM
    Return this form by June 23, 2000 to:  ast3@ceres.tn.cornell.edu
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

A. AUTHOR CONTACT INFORMATION:

NAME:
ADDRESS:


E-MAIL:
PHONE:
FAX:

B.  THE BROAD CATEGORY UNDER WHICH YOUR PROPOSED CHAPTER FALLS
    (Mark one with an "X")

--- Asteroid cosmochemisty
--- Asteroid spectroscopy/observations
--- Asteroid families
--- Asteroid search programs
--- Asteroid collisions and impact processes
--- Origins of asteroids
--- Asteroid geology
--- Asteroid sizes/albedos/taxonomy/radiometry
--- Other

C. PROPOSED TITLE OF CHAPTER


D. DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED CHAPTER

Please give a short description (100-200 words) of your proposed
contribution.  Please include the following:

(1) The topics you would address in your chapter.
(2) Their importance to the asteroid community.


E. DESCRIPTION OF YOUR PROPOSED ROLE
   (Mark one with an "X")

    I propose to serve as a first author for the described
--- chapter, and agree to the strict deadlines outlined above
    and agree to be solely responsible for page charges.

    List of proposed co-authors:
     (You must clearly define and specify a role for each,
      subject to the limitation  of 2-3 persons, as described above.)


    I propose to serve as a chapter co-author.  (In the space below,
--- indicate who is the proposed first author, if known.)



    I am willing to serve as a reviewer of chapter manuscripts
--- in the following areas:

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Return this form by June 23, 2000 to:  ast3@ceres.tn.cornell.edu
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

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